Bronx second-graders receive and give back to New York community

Story & photos by Matthew Hancock, Intern

Teachers from P.S. 1, also known as The Courtlandt School, usually come to World Vision's Greater New York warehouse on their own to pick up school supplies.

Carma Lee Vasquez (in pink) and Karla Ave each hold the end of a giant pencil as classmates from P.S. 1 cluster around them in the Teacher Resource Center at World Vision's Greater New York warehouse.

Carma Lee Vasquez (in pink) and Karla Ave each hold the end of a giant pencil as classmates from P.S. 1 cluster around them in the Teacher Resource Center at World Vision's Greater New York warehouse.

But when Melissa Conti visited the Bronx site in early June, she brought her 18 second-graders to tour the facility and learn how it operates.

Conti's class had received a La-Z-Boy® recliner from World Vision. The students were curious about where it came from and wanted to learn more.

"The kids got to see what a warehouse is like, what the machinery is like, and what it’s like to volunteer for an organization," Conti says.

World Vision's warehouse in the south Bronx has been serving the Greater New York community for almost 15 years, developing partnerships with various organizations, including churches and schools like P.S. 1.

The Courtlandt School, located in an under-resourced area in the South Bronx, describes itself as "a learning community that is dedicated to fostering ethical, caring, self-reflective, and critical thinkers."

Not only did the students see some heavy machinery in action, such as a forklift and a baler, they also were able to help Conti "shop" for donated school supplies in the Teacher Resource Center section of the warehouse.

Bright-eyed Carma Lee Vasquez was among 18 second-graders from P.S. 1, also known as The Courtlandt School, who learned how World Vision operates and did a volunteer project to help others.

Bright-eyed Carma Lee Vasquez was among 18 second-graders from P.S. 1, also known as The Courtlandt School, who learned how World Vision operates and did a volunteer project to help others.

"I can see how much the families and children rely on the products that World Vision distributes, and it makes me happy to see how grateful they are to receive the goods," Conti says.

After the shopping concluded, the second-graders participated in a volunteer project before heading back to school. They emptied pencils out of boxes and placed them into large red bins so they could be ready to be distributed. The simple task let them experience helping others.

"I think it's important for the kids to see what it's like to give back [to] their community," Conti says. "Even though they definitely have their own needs, it's important for them to realize that they can still give back."

 

 

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